Who is the tragic hero antigone or creon essay

. Bremer and Dawe both conclude that the will of the gods may factor into Aristotelian hamartia. Golden disagrees. [28] Bremer observes that the Messenger in Oedipus Rex says, "He was raging - one of the dark powers pointing the way, ...someone, something leading him on - he hurled at the twin doors and bending the bolts back out of their sockets, crashed through the chamber,". [29] Bremer cites Sophocles' mention of Oedipus being possessed by "dark powers" as evidence of guidance from either divine or daemonic force. Dawe's argument centers around tragic dramatists' four areas from which a protagonist's demise can originate. The first is fate, the second is wrath of an angry god, the third comes from a human enemy, and the last is the protagonist's frailty or error. Dawe contends that the tragic dénouement can be the result of a divine plan as long as plot action begets plot action in accordance with Aristotle. Golden cites Van Braam's notion of Oedipus committing a tragic error by trusting his own intellect in spite of Tiresias' warning as the argument for human error over divine manipulation. Golden concludes that hamartia principally refers to a matter of intellect, although it may include elements of morality. What his study asserts is separate from hamartia, in a view that conflicts with Dawe's and Bremer's, is the concept of divine retribution. [30]

Who is the tragic hero antigone or creon essay

who is the tragic hero antigone or creon essay

Media:

who is the tragic hero antigone or creon essaywho is the tragic hero antigone or creon essaywho is the tragic hero antigone or creon essaywho is the tragic hero antigone or creon essay