Poetry essay on the road not taken

'The Liverpool poets' appeared on the literary scene in 1967, the name being coined by Edward Lucie-Smith [1] who called his anthology of their work: 'The Liverpool Scene'. The chief poets were Adrian Henri (1932 - 2000) Roger McGough (1937 - ) and Brian Patten (1946 - ).

The work of 'The Liverpool poets' was written to be read aloud in public, and although the poets have now developed separately, their literary outlook is still characterized by their common commitment to reviving poetry as a performance.

'The Liverpool poets'' approach to poetry differs from that of other poets in that they consistently give the impression of being real people getting to grips with real and pressing situations. According to Edward Lucie-Smith 'The Liverpool poets' feel a 'real sympathy for their environment' and are more interested in life than in literature. This is the quality that sets them apart from the other post-modern poets. Like the French Symbolists, Baudelaire and Rimbaud, 'The Liverpool poets' believe that the effect that a poem produces is more important than the poem itself; a poem should be considered as an 'agent' (that conveys the poet's message), rather than as an 'object'.

Poetry essay on the road not taken

poetry essay on the road not taken

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